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Jak użyć CPP? Definicja w konsoli the first pass of any C compilation by the gcc command. The.
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Komenda/polecenie: Jak użyć cpp

Uruchomienie, wykonanie: cpp [options] [ifile [ofile] ]

Jak działa, co robi: GNU C language preprocessor. cpp is normally invoked as the first pass of any C compilation by the gcc command. The output of cpp is a form acceptable as input to the next pass of the C compiler. The ifile and ofile options are, respectively, the input and output for the preprocessor; they default to standard input and standard output

Dostępne opcje, wywołanie: -$

Do not allow $ in identifiers.

-ansi

Use 1990 ISO C standard. This is equivalent to -std=c89.

-dD

Similar to -dM, but exclude predefined macros and include results of preprocessing.

-dM

Suppress normal output. Print series of #defines that create the macros used in the source file.

-dN

Similar to -dD, but don't print macro expansions.

-dI

Print #include directives in addition to other output.

-fpreprocessed

Treat file as already preprocessed. Skip most processing directives, remove all comments, and tokenize file.

-ftabstop=width

Set distance between tabstops so columns will be reported correctly in warnings and errors. Default is 8.

-fno-show-column

Omit column numbers in warnings and errors.

-gcc

Define _ _GNUC_ _, _ _GNUC_MINOR_ _, and _ _GNUC_PATCHLEVEL_ _ macros.

--help

Print usage message and exit.

-idirafter dir

Search dir for header files when a header file is not found in any of the included directories.

-imacros file

Process macros in file before processing main files.

-include file

Process file before main file.

-iprefix prefix

When adding directories with -iwithprefix, prepend prefix to the directory's name.

-isystem dir

Search dir for header files after searching directories specified with -I but before searching standard system directories.

-iwithprefix dir

Append dir to the list of directories to be searched when a header file cannot be found in the main include path. If -iprefix has been set, prepend that prefix to the directory's name.

-iwithprefixbefore dir

Insert dir at the beginning of the list of directories to be searched when a header file cannot be found in the main include path. If -iprefix has been set, prepend that prefix to the directory's name.

-lang-c, -lang-c++, -lang-objc, -lang-objc++

Expect the source to be in C, C++, Objective C, or Objective C++, respectively.

-lint

Display all lint commands in comments as #pragma lint command.

-nostdinc

Search only specified, not standard, directories for header files.

-nostdinc++

Suppress searching of directories believed to contain C++-specific header files.

-o file

Write output to file. (Same as specifying a second filename in the command line.)

-pedantic

Warn verbosely.

-pedantic-errors

Produce a fatal error in every case in which -pedantic would have produced a warning.

-std=standard

Specify C standard of input file. Accepted values are:

iso9899:1990, c89

1990 ISO C standard.

iso9899:199409

1994 amendment to the 1990 ISO C standard.

iso9899:1999, c99, iso9899:199x, c9x

1999 revised ISO C standard.

gnu89

1990 C Standard with gnu extensions. The default value.

gnu99, gnu9x

1999 revised ISO C standard with gnu extensions.

-traditional

Behave like traditional C, not ANSI.

-trigraphs

Convert special three-letter sequences, meant to represent missing characters on some terminals, into the single character they represent.

-undef

Suppress definition of all nonstandard macros.

-v

Verbose mode.

-version

Print version number, then process file.

--version

Print version number, then exit.

-w

Don't print warnings.

-x language

Specify the language of the input file. language may be c, c++, objective-c, or assembler-with-cpp. By default, language is deduced from the filename extension. If the extension is unrecognized, the default is c.

-A name[=def]

Assert name with value def as if defined by #assert. To turn off standard assertions, use -A-.

-A -name[=def]

Cancel assertion name with value def.

-C

Retain all comments except those found on cpp directive lines. By default, cpp strips C-style comments.

-Dname[=def]

Define name with value def as if by a #define. If no =def is given, name is defined with value 1. -D has lower precedence than -U.

-E

Preprocess the source files, but do not compile. Print result to standard output. This option is usually passed from gcc.

-H

Print pathnames of included files, one per line, on standard error.

-Idir

Search in directory dir for #include files whose names do not begin with / before looking in directories on standard list. #include files whose names are enclosed in double quotes and do not begin with / will be searched for first in the current directory, then in directories named on -I options, and last in directories on the standard list.

-I-

Split includes. Search directories specified by -I options preceding this one for header files included with quotes (#include "file.h") but not for header files included with angle brackets (#include <file.h>). Search directories specified by -I options following this one for all header files.

-M [-MG]

Suppress normal output. Print a rule for make that describes the main source file's dependencies. If -MG is specified, assume that missing header files are actually generated files, and look for them in the source file's directory.

-MF file

Print rules generated by -M or -MM to file.

-MD file

Similar to -M, but output to file; also compile the source.

-MM

Similar to -M, but describe only those files included as a result of #include "file".

-MMD file

Similar to -MD, but describe only the user's header files.

-MQ target

Similar to -MT, but quote any characters that are special to make.

-MT target

Specify the target to use when generating a rule for make. By default, the target is based on the name of the main input file.

-P

Preprocess input without producing line-control information used by next pass of the C compiler.

-Uname

Remove any initial definition of name, where name is a reserved symbol predefined by the preprocessor, or a name defined on a -D option. Names predefined by cpp are unix and i386 (for Intel systems).

-Wall

Warn both on nested comments and trigraphs.

-Wcomment, -Wcomments

Warn when encountering the beginning of a nested comment.

-Wtraditional

Warn when encountering constructs that are interpreted differently in ANSI than in traditional C.

-Wtrigraphs

Warn when encountering trigraphs, which are three-letter sequences meant to represent missing characters on some terminals.

Użycie CPP zastosowanie komendy na linii poleceńw Słownik C .